Sunday, March 02, 2008

I would like to share the art of M. Karwacki





M. Karwacki was my uncle, he died years ago from cancer. I think the inks I am showing here are from the 80's. He was an artist, but also did design for theater and television productions. He was very much a contemporary to Beksinski and Duda Gracz. Also, of course he's completely obscure, but still he represented what in Poland was referred to as Plastic Surrealism (aka Neo-surrealism). Karwacki's art, as well as early Duda Gracz and unlike Beksinski's, was saturated with a commentary on the dystopia of Polish socialism. (Which in young America is seen in a very romantic light- though people don't have a clue of what they're talking about.) Also, my earliest memories and exposure to art, were spent in his studio. I apologise for the quality of the images- but they are from my aunt's photo collection, if you guys like this and want to see more, I probably can do something about that.

7 comments:

Mr. Sean said...

Very cool! Reminds of me of a sloppier, more interesting Patrick Woodroffe. (the slickness of Woodroffe's work really turns me off). I'd be interested in seeing more for sure. As far as Americans romanticizing Poland under Communism, this is the first i've heard of it. Most people i talk to feel that Poland & most of Eastern Europe has been crushed over & over again & how sad it is.

MD Encolpius said...

I'm glad you like it. My uncle died when he was 40-so who knows where all of this would have went. What I mean when I said "American romantization of socialism" I am referring to the younger generation- those I hear at the bars and see in Che tee-shirts, and talking about how 'amazing' socialism is and how America needs it. (You know medicine and healthcare for everyone,etc- that's socialism; under the government's boot) I should probably re-phrase that on the post. haha

Luke Pski said...

Wow. This is great stuff. Thanks for sharing it.
I do see a romanticization of socialism around these parts ( St. Paul/Minneapolis) , definitely ; I don't think they really know what that means. It seems to be inspired by a hatred of conservatism ( as though Bush represents Conservatism) and ingesting all kinds of propaganda at our local universities. I think they imagine that they, the "educated" few, along with their aging hippy professors would be the ones in charge and would end everything they consider unjust by snapping their fingers and writing poor people checks...
Anyhow, is it me, or does there seem to be a commonality between a lot of Pole/Slav arts? Maybe it's because that's all we see, but so much of it sems to be this raw kind of surrealism. It's a lot like the stuff I drew before I became aware of wanting to be an "artist" . This might be a romantic fantasy on my part, by I do feel some kind of ethnic connection to this material..

MD Encolpius said...

I hear you on the Pola-Solva-Surrealism thing, I used to think it was an urban legend, too. I really don't know the reason for it. Perhaps it's our social structures in Eastern Europe that leave their citizens with a 'surreal' feeling- Or maybe it's the language. The funny thing is the Surrealism didn't even originate in Eastern Europe. Who knows.
At 29 I consider myself to be one of the older guard, I'm not even sure what people who are 18-20 over there are into. I think Geiger and Beksinski's work (and probably others) definitely prolonged the effects of Surrealism in the society.

Luke Pski said...

I'm, 29 too.
Are you into the Polish poster thing?
Here's a whole bunch of them: http://www.polishposter.com/Merchant2/merchant.mvc?Screen=CTGY&Category_Code=PBA

Yeah, I think some kind of perfect admixture scenario must've occured for all of that material to sprout up at around the same time.It isn't even so much that it's all surreal, it's that it all show a definite kind of surrealism, a feel.

Aeron said...

Excellent work, this certainly has that Polish vibe that I see in a lot of the more fantastic work from that region.

Robert Adam Gilmour said...

I'm glad you posted all this, he was obviously a talented man.